5 Replies Latest reply: Nov 5, 2013 1:01 PM by Jeanne Rogers RSS

Grading Homework -- How do you grade homework in middle school?

hmena New User
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I have found a great way to grade homework as an 8th grade math teacher.  It is 100% effort based and the students and parents love it -- I gave out a rubric at the beginning of the year and students self-grade.  I love it -- it is a time saver and helps students learn self-direction (a new 21st century skill).  How do you grade homework?

  • Re: Grading Homework -- How do you grade homework in middle school?
    Jane Brown Master
    Currently Being Moderated

    A really good question, Mena. The first year I graded every homework paper with detailed corrections in red. I noticed that a student would glance at his paper and toss it into the trash or file it in the back of his notebook. I quickly figured out that I was the only one learning and my time might be better spent in preparation of lessons.

     

    The second year I wrote the problem numbers on the board and took volunteers to come up and write out their solutions.  Each student in succession would then to go up to his problem and explain his steps and validate his process, answering questions raised by other students or me.  This gave them all a better understanding of the process and some confidence in presentation.  I made little marks in the grade book and calculated a homework grade for volunteers based on active participation.

     

    I do like the rubric idea and putting the task on the individual student to self grade homework.  What do you do with a student who just doesn't comply?

     

    Looking forward to reading more strategies for grading homework.

  • Re: Grading Homework -- How do you grade homework in middle school?
    Jeanne Rogers Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    I also used homework as a participation "grade." Back then, we used the check +, check - method of grading.  I've found something similar that is used in New Jersey.

     

    Homework and your in-class notebook are graded with a check, check plus, or check minus. The following are what each signifies:

    • Check Plus (A range)= Done extremely well. Student has put forth effort and assignment/notebook entry is of sufficient length for the assignment given, is thoughtful, and does not present any written “fatal flaws.”
    • Check (B to C+ range)= Student has worked on the assignment and has put forth some effort. A “fatal flaw” may have been present in assignment but was rectified by student accordingly within one day. The overall work of assignment is decent, but may have been worked on more.
    • Check Minus (C to D range)= Student has put effort into the piece, only enough so that it is readable. Thoughts are not original and effort is minimal. More than a few “fatal flaws” exist and have been rectified accordingly within one day. Assignment needs a little more work as far as content is concerned.
    • Zero (F)= Student has not turned in homework that was due that day or student’s work contains a “fatal flaw” that has NOT been rectified within one day.

    Would you share your homework rubric?

  • Re: Grading Homework -- How do you grade homework in middle school?
    renee.mcknight New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I'm glad to see teachers are still grading homework. It seems to me it has become increasingly popular to not expect students to do it and, as a math teacher, this befuddles me. You all may be interested in reading this Duke Study: Homework Helps Students Succeed in School, As Long as There Isn't Too Much | Duke Today Mobile

     

    I'm interested to hear more about how the homework rubric is used with the student's grade average. For example, a check check minus is in the C to D range. In our district that is 70-80. How would you record a check minus as a numerical grade?

  • Re: Grading Homework -- How do you grade homework in middle school?
    renee.mcknight New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    Would you mind sharing your homework rubric?

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