3 Replies Latest reply: Dec 3, 2013 11:12 PM by orayoray RSS

What is the future of NCLB? What will happen in 2014 when our schools haven’t met the NCLB mandates for ELA and Math?

Tammy Dewan Novice
Currently Being Moderated

During my TESOL course, one of my students proposed a question asking what will happen in 2014 when our schools haven’t met the NCLB mandate that every student needs to achieve high standards in ELA and Math. My students and I were doing some Internet searches to see if we could gain some insights on what the future holds for No Child Left Behind. We found a few articles and blogs but nothing that gave us a clear idea. I thought I would propose this question to the Community to see what information you have gathered and/or opinions you have formed on the future of NCLB and the fast approaching deadline of 2014.

 

What is the future of NCLB? What will happen in 2014 when our schools haven’t met the NCLB mandates for ELA and Math?

Where do we go from here? What's the buzz at your school among educators?


  • Re: What is the future of NCLB? What will happen in 2014 when our schools haven’t met the NCLB mandates for ELA and Math?
    orayoray New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    The information in the attachment was submitted to a discussion forum at Grand Canyon University.  The course is TSL - 531 taught by Instructor Tammy Dewan.  That said the essay was written November 23, 2013.  Finally, the material/information comes from Olden Ray.

    • Re: What is the future of NCLB? What will happen in 2014 when our schools haven’t met the NCLB mandates for ELA and Math?
      Tammy Dewan Novice
      Currently Being Moderated

      Olden, thank you so much for posting such an insightful essay to share with us the research on the future of NCLB! It was interesting to hear that already 32 states have asked the government for a waiver because they will not meet the requirement for have having all students proficient in English Language Arts and Mathematics. It was also eye-opening to hear that “According to the DOE, an estimated 80 percent of American schools are on track to “fail” by 2014.  No Child Left Behind’s 100 percent intervention requirement was always unrealistic, and could never have been enforced” (Goldstein, 2011).


      I was thinking about your statement on how the schools that are performing as completely full with no room for parents to choice to send their child to a performing school. My husband and I will soon be in this predicament very soon. Our next Navy assignment will be in Washington DC. All the schools that have a high rating and are performing require a “lottery” to get in. If my son isn’t one of the lucky students, than we would have to pay over $10,000 for him to attend a private school for kindergarten. To me, that just seems ridiculous to spend that much money for a 5 year old to go to a decent school. Our other option is to send him to a school that has a very low rating with low test scores. It is very stressful for us. I want the best for our son just like every other parent. We aren’t left with many options.

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