11 Replies Latest reply: Apr 5, 2012 5:25 PM by kirstin RSS

What do you really know about volcanoes?

Khorn Novice
Currently Being Moderated

New feature just posted on the index page of Verizon Thinkfinity. Just as Tsunami was a new concept for all science teachers to cover, so now is the volcano because of the timely volcanic ash that has shut down transatlantic travel. Check out this link http://www.sciencenetlinks.com/lessons.php?DocID=296.

This is a K-2 listing, but do not be fooled.  Scroll down to Volcano World, Types of Volcanoes, and Lava Flow.  This is an amazing resource for all grade levels.

  • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
    christine Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    That *is* a cool resource! I saved it as a Favorite Resource in case anyone wants to share: Science NetLinks: Erupting Volcanoes!

  • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
    maria_sosa Novice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Found this today and thought it might be worth sharing here.

    Volcweb – A new public tool for exploring earthquakes on Hawaii

  • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
    hfox784 New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I live at the foot of the Haleakala Volcano, which is actually in my backyard. As I drive to work my view is of the beautiful West Maui Mountains and when coming home I see the incredible Haleakals Mountain.

     

    Before I completed my school science class both volcanoes visually faded into the scenery and their beauty was taken forgranted. Now, I pay homage to the beauty and formation every day. The fact that over hot spots filled with molten lava, facilitated by the shifting of tectonic plates that over hundreds of years, up from underneath the water these perfectly, intriguing, beguiling mountains grew to accomodate thousands of residents.

     

    I am also reminded each time I attempt planting flowers in a ground made of rock, red clay, and very hard soil that I live on a volcano. Mount Haleakala is a shield volcano and in Hawaiian its name translates into "House of the Sun," At an altitude of 10,023 feet, snow has fallen upon the summit many times over the 23 years I have lived here.

     

    Haleaka is a dormant volcano erupting 20 times over 2,500 years and quite possibly will again within the next 100 years. It Measures 25,000 feet from its base under water and is 33 miles long, 24 miles wide after emerging 1 million years ago.

     

    A two hour drive up a very high, narrow, windy road that scares the "bejiggers" out of me, ends at the summit where you can spend the night on land imitating an appearance of the moon or take an all day hike or pony ride through the crater to have a picnic lunch and see many strange plants, rocks, and formations.

     

    Many tourists are driven up in vans at 3am to watch pink, orange, and purplish sunrises and then ride bicycles down the twisty, turning road past my house, then ending at baby beach in Spreckelsville after having a bite to eat at a restaurant on the way.

     

    Many of these tourists land in my yard after losing control of their bicycles when coming down a steep hill and I have a collection of sunglasses as proof. Mahalo nui loa and pau hana hui hou.

    • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
      maria_sosa Novice
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      What a great post, Helene. Thanks for sharing your experiences with us.

    • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
      Jane Brown Master
      Currently Being Moderated

      Thank you for sharing "your volcano."  You make it come alive in a personal way for us. Do you have a picture that you can share too?  Would enjoy seeing your view of the Haleakala Volcano.

      • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
        hfox784 New User
        Currently Being Moderated

        I love that you all can become familiar with the beauty of this island vicariously through my eyes. I uploaded some pics that I shared with my class of the West Maui Mountains and Haleakala and I have some of the summit that I will dig around for to upload later for hiking and watching the sunrise and the sunsets are unforgettable experiences. Also amazing is to see Haleakala with snow ontop. It is amazingly cold up there at 30-50 degrees, yet at sea level 80 degrees.

         

        The sparatic Silversword and other plants that grow atop provoke my imagination back to prehistoric ages because they look like something dinosaurs would eat. In addition one can just imagine what it was like when astronauts first walked the moon because ithe crater is barron, other than plant growth with small mountains and crevices. I imagine a child's imagination must run rampant up there as mine probably have the few times we braved the journey up and down, just happy staying home and sharing space with it.

         

        The many creatures that live in the West Maui Mountains can only be imagined as mythical, perhaps unicorns but for sure dangerous boar the size of small horses with red glowing eyes and snorting, drooling, noises from their pig-like noses under which large tusks grown from frightening faces that will eat small children and adults alike. Many locals lose their pets and then hunt them down to proudly drive through town with bleeding dead boar strapped to their hoods , which I hate by the way.

         

        Many historical battles were fought in the West Maui Mountains and they are sacrad due to the many fallen warriors that remain and because of that they will never be developed, thank God for this island is losing more and more natural undeveloped land daily as more and more developers manipulate the law and build to support their greed.

         

        Iao Valley in the West Valley Mountains is a shrine to those fallen warriors and has been set aside for visitors to hike and pray to those who fought for their island. It is also the area that receives the most rainfall and heavy rains beat upon the skin and sting. One imagines that the fallen warriors do not want individuals walking with eyes peering onto the land beneath which they lie and for which they fought to protect.

         

        Volcanoes are truly majical and full of life and history that provokes the imagination of children and adults alike. They are great learning experiences that allow us the opportunity to learn the history of the planet we live on and to realize the importance of preserving the land and to stop polluting for it is man that shall be the death of it, thereby destroying themselves.

         

        Enjoy the pics everyone and I shall attempt to find the crater pics to post shortly. Aloha Nui Loa A hui hou KakouGEDC1274.JPGGEDC1275.JPGGEDC1275.JPGGEDC1277.JPGGEDC1283.JPGGEDC1297.JPG

        • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
          Jane Brown Master
          Currently Being Moderated

          Forgive me for editing your text into shorter paragraphs, Helene.  It is a fact that people can read only about four lines of text, too much text and it is hard for the eyes to track.

           

          I am so looking forward to more of your pictures.  What a great way for teachers to pull in pictures during a lesson on volcanoes, not to mention the option for the children to have the teacher post their questions to you.  :-)  Thank you so much for sharing your view.

           

          Jane Brown

          Community Manger

          • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
            hfox784 New User
            Currently Being Moderated

            As a parent of three, I am so glad to be a participant in a child's learning and will post more pics this weekend and please ask any questions for I recently completed a college class on the subject so I have a personal view and knowledge as well as classroom information to add to your expertise. Many classrooms put forth information someone else feels is of importance and as a student I can put forth the information from a viewpoint of what interests a student and add the colorful language from my own personal view of the mountains that facilitates the retention of what is learned. Learning is always better when it can be envisioned and can be held within the mind in color, particularly for students with preferences toward visual learning. Aloha nui loa & malama pono

            • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
              Jane Brown Master
              Currently Being Moderated

              Ok, I know that Aloha can mean hello or goodbye, right?

               

              May I ask what the following signoffs translate to in English?

               

              • Mahalo nui loa and pau hana hui hou
              • Aloha Nui Loa A hui hou Kakou
              • Aloha nui loa & malama pono
              • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
                hfox784 New User
                Currently Being Moderated

                In Hawaii you never hear the native language but locals as well as us "haole" (negative offensive slang for westerners, like "******" is  to afro americans as well as the rest of the world), incorporate phrases in honor of the native Hawaiian language and to pay homage to Hawaiian land. Instead, locals (native Hawaiians with Hawaiian ancestry)  "Hawaiian pidgeon", a type of slang, I say is lazy language, is used.  For example pointing to just about everything and calling it "dakine", saying tree instead of three, pau for done, et al. Mahalo nui loa and pau (pow) hana hui hou translates into thank you very much for your kind response and time for me to go, or signing off. Aloha and Mahalo are both used as thank you, hello or goodbye, nui loa emphasizes those words by adding "very much," A hui hou means till we meet again and adding Kakou simply changes the saying to "Untill" we meet again making it more grammatically correct. Malama pono is a message that translates into To take care of, preserve, protect, maintain the environment. And for the heck of it, I will throw in my favorite Hawaiian word;  Humuhumunukunukuapua'a, the State fish, a triggerfish that tastes great. A hui hou (a-who-ee-ho).

  • Re: What do you really know about volcanoes?
    kirstin New User
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    2012 is the 100th anniversary of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, and the U.S. Geological Survey has put out a book about it. (The Story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory—A Remarkable First 100 Years of Tracking Eruptions and Earthquakes by Janet L. Babb, James P. Kauahikaua, and Robert I. Tilling.) Copies are available for a nominal handling fee, but it's also available for free download as a high-quality PDF. I admit I haven't read it thoroughly, but a cursory glance through suggests it would be suitable for middle school and higher. And there are lots of great color photos, as well as archival shots.

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