36 Replies Latest reply: Mar 29, 2014 5:59 PM by Lynne Hoffman RSS

Are you "flipping" your classroom?

pterry Novice
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Have you tried ‘flipping” your classroom? If so, what suggestions do you have for others who are considering this approach? If not, what conditions would need to be in place in order for you to try it?

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    on_the_go New User
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    Great topic! I am interested in learning more about "flipping classrooms" and "flipping lessons". I teach kindergarten and would like to hear from other K teachers who have tried this innovative process.

    • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
      jshrader New User
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      I'm part of co-hort in my county who are "flipping" this year.....we have a kindergarten teacher who is in the group.....I'll contact her and see if she is interested in sharing through this venue.

      • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
        pterry Novice
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        Jane,

         

        I'm sure that with the start of the school year being everyone's priority that your co-hort has been quite busy for the past few weeks. I hadn't heard of other schools using a co-hort approach to "flipping" but it seems like such a terrific idea, because you have a built in support structure to help you all become successful! Do share your experiences with us so that we can all learn what you have discovered that works. And we'd also love to hear how your Kindergarten colleague is implementing these strategies!

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    jwelton New User
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    I was going to try this for at least one unit in the 2012-13 school year with my HS Trigonometry class. My basic plan at the moment is to use Kahn Academy videos (or create my own videos if the topic is not covered completely) and then use class time to do "homework". However, I'm concerned that all of my students do not have access to internet at home.

    • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
      Jane Brown Master
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      Since the idea of "flipping" your classroom is new to American teachers and you have identified a potential problem for you, the questions become how serious is this "digital divide" for the students in your class and are there potential workarounds.

       

      Perhaps we should be talking about "flipped lessons" rather than "flipped classrooms" since as you point out you are ready to test the waters with one unit. Maybe "flipping" isn't an all or nothing thing. Maybe we just have to figure out when to use it to engage our students. I can see this method working to enhance differentiated learning for a variety of student skills.

       

      I hope others will offer you suggestions here and even better, I hope as you try this out with your students, you will come back and give us some insights into you successes, yes and failures. We all can learn from both.

      • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
        jwelton New User
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        I think it does have to be an all-or-nothing thing. Let's say I assign the students to watch the lesson at home so they can do the practice in class. If several do not watch it, I will have to use my time to teach them the lesson, which defeats the purpose of having them watch it at home. Perhaps, if I had a co-teacher, one of us could work with the students that watched the lesson already and one of us could teach the lesson to the others.

         

        I will have to survey the students when the year begins to find out how big the "digital divide" will be. I think it shouldn't be as high as it used to be since many students now have cell phones that can browse the internet as well as possibly having the internet on a computer at home.

      • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
        Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
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        Tech & Learning online magazine included an article recently on "Flipping the Classroom" that provides an excerpt from the book, Flip Your Classroom (©2012, ISTE® International Society for Technology in Education) by authors Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams, that outlines reasons why educators should consider this model.

        Flip.JPG

        The article states that teachers around the world have adopted the flipped classroom model and are using it to teach a variety of courses to students of all ages. 

         

        What do you think of using the flipped classroom idea to differentiate instruction?


      • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
        Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
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        Tech & Learning just posted the Top 10 Sites/Apps for a Flipped Classroom by David Kapuler (July 25, 2013).

         

        The following list is taken from Kapuler's blog post:

        • 9Slides - A wonderful way for teachers to create an interactive/guided presentation for their students flipped learning.
        • Answer Pad - The ultimate assessment tool for teachers to use with their mobile devices or browser to gauge student's learning.
        • Ask3 - A fantastic iPad app for turning your iPad into a recordable whiteboard.  This allows for a teacher to create guided lessons (by adding text/drawing/narration) that students can view at home.  Students can then use the app in class to answer each other questions before asking the teacher, while teachers can use it to assess student's learning.
        • BoomWriter - An excellent innovative site that allows students engage their creativity by completing chapters of a book/story and then having other students vote on which one should be included in the finished product.  Once a book/story is completed a trade paperback copy can be ordered, turning students into published writers.
        • Educreations - A terrific iPad app that is very similar to Ask3 as it turns the iPad into a recordable whiteboard.  However, teachers can not only create a guided lessons, but also post them on the web for their students to view at home for flipped learning.
        • GoClass - A wonderful iPad/web tool that allows educators to create lessons and then assess students learning in real-time.  Also, students can view the lessons at home on their mobile devices and learn at their own pace.
        • Knowmia - One of the most popular sites/apps for creating and searching for video lessons for students.  Simply put, Knowmia is one of the best and easiest ways to flip a classroom.
        • Math File Folder Games - A great site/company for educational iOS Math games that can be used to create 21st Century "Math Centers."  This is a great way to use educational apps to reinforce flipped learning.
        • MentorMob - A fantastic site for educators to create guided learning playlists that students can use at home for self learning.  One of the best sites around for creating a flipped classroom.
        • Nearpod - A terrific all-in-one solution for mobile devices in education.  Teachers can use it to create engaging lessons that students can do from home.

         

        Has anyone tried any of these sites/apps in flipping a classroom?  Please share your experiences with us.


    • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
      Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
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      Amy Gordon writes--

      Technology empowers students to take ownership of their own learning. Take a look at the model of the "flipped classroom" that has been receiving a great deal of attention recently. How can this model enhance what we do in the classroom?

       

      Salman Khan  "Let's use video to reinvent education"

      http://www.ted.com/talks/salman_khan_let_s_use_video_to_reinvent_education.html


  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
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    Here's an interesting infographic depicting the "What do teachers who’ve flipped their classrooms have to report?" published by Tech & Learning

     

    Do you see any surprises in the results of this study?  You can also participate in this ongoing survey by following the link in this article.

     

    Lynne

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
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    I recommend taking a look at a post by Richard Byrne --"Three Questions to Consider Before Flipping Your Classroom"--Free Technology for Teachers December 29, 2012. 

     

     

    Bryne's questions are good food for thought:

    1. Do the majority of your students complete their homework assignments on time on a consistent basis?
    2. Do all of your students have access to the web at home? If not, how are you going to address that?
    3. Do you have time to create quality videos? If not, will you create some and then source the rest of from the web?

    Do you share his view that flipping your classroom may be a good idea, yet it may not be the solution in all situations?

    Are you planning to try the flipped classroom model?

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
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    Tech & Learning published a blog post by Ellen Ullman (April 23, 2013) that shares the four stories of teachers who have adopted a flipped classroom format and are thrilled with the results.  Their experiences cover successful ventures in math, English language arts, science, and professional development.  Check out their stories, videos, and resources in the blog "Tools and Tips for the Flipped Classroom."

     

    Does this give you some new ideas?  Are you "flipped" over flipping?

     

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    Jeanne Rogers Apprentice
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    Take a look at the Southwest Airlines Spirit Magazine article entitled, "Flipped Out", that was written by Jennifer Miller.

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    mso Novice
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    This is terrific discussion Pati, with so many valuable resources on the pros and cons of the "flipped classroom".

    I have been exploring this topic and came across a video clip by Katie Gimbar, instructor with Friday Institute at NC State.  She presents information about how flipping provides for greater differentiation...something I had not considered and thought I would share...

     

     

    What do you think?

    Marie

    • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
      Jane Brown Master
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      Marie, I really liked this video and will watch for more videos by Katie Gimbar. Thank you for sharing it here. While a flipped classroom takes more time up front. It reduces teacher and student frustrations. Katie made very clear her reasons for flipping her classroom. It think this is especially productive in math classes.

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    jshrader New User
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    We are moving to more of a "blended learning" scenario.....My students do not have equal access to technology outside of school.....so we have to make accommodations for them to do all activities that are a "must" during school hours......before or after school in the media center, a study hall or missing the occasional encore (PE, Art, music, etc).....lunch......

    • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
      Jeanne Rogers Apprentice
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      Hello Jane, I am most anxious to hear how this works for the students who do not have access.  Before and after school in the media center only works if there is adult supervision provided and that wasn't always the case where I worked due to other duties staff had to perform. One of the teachers in our district set up a mini lab in the classroom where students could rotate to and had to actually get the lesson information first before they could proceed.  At the secondary level electives are not to be missed, viewed as important as the core subjects and with Common Core Standards they are filling in gaps with assistance on reading and math skills incorporated into their lessons. I'm wondering if there are others who have found some solutions to this issue.  Students may have internet access, but perhaps have to share time with others in the family.  Or perhaps their computers do not run Flash etc.  Lots of variables to consider and work around.

      • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
        jshrader New User
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        This is certainly going to be a "work in progress".....As I said earlier, I am not really "flipping"  - my students this year will have 1:1 access to chromebooks when they are with me for Language Arts.....I will be integrating technology  - some face-to-face, some completely online while they are with me in the room. Anything I have them do, I have to be sure it can be completed at school.  Fortunately, our media center does have adult coverage all day.....but you have asked many of the really hard questions that we are all facing.....

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
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    Check out the blog Flipped Classrooms: Sweeping Schools Across the Nation by Maya Inamura from Science NetLinks that provides links to numerous resources in support of flipping your classroom. 

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
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    Flipped and blended learning are reported to have a positive impact on learning.

     

    According to "Blended and Flipped Learning" published in Tech & Learning (August 23, 2013), "The overall opinion was that blended learning is driving learning to become more outcome-based, where the value of learning comes from the process and the days of questions that can be 'Googled' are fading away."

     

    What advantages do you see in rethinking the use of time, communication, collaboration, expectations, and the physical space of the classroom to accommodate blended learning?

    • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
      Jeanne Rogers Apprentice
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      Lynne, I'm glad you brought up the suggestion that the physical space of the classroom may need to be adjusted to accommodate a blended learning environment. When I started using Kagan's cooperative learning structures back in the 90's, I went to my principal and said that the student desks weren't very convenient for collaborative work.  He suggested we buy trapezoid tables.  They could be separated for a testing environment, and grouped together for other activities.  It may seem like a small thing, to have tables in lieu of individual student desks, but it made a huge difference in my classroom. In today's elementary schools, I see many variations of learning areas. However, I've been in several middle schools and high schools recently where desks in rows is still the norm. I'm curious to know about other classrooms around the country.

      • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
        Kingston Apprentice
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        Jeanne,

        Last year I taught in a traditional school in Scottsdale, AZ and there were rows of students.  Being a traditional school, they do not believe in collaboration and communication, as it is a teacher directed school and not the student directed.  This might be the problem, more traditional schools.

         

        I am now teaching in a Learning Center, more my style, also in Scottsdale and the concept is at the other end of the spectrum.  I feel that student directed supports the 21st Century Skills of creativity, critical thinking, communication and collaboration which I believe should be the focus essential to preparing students for the future; but do you think that students are back into rows because of discipline problems?

         

        What are your thoughts?  Would poor discipline be the result of putting students back into a traditional setting?

        Kingston

         

         

         

         


        • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
          cmuller Novice
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          Hi Kingston,

           

          What was the name of the traditional school you taught at in Scottsdale,Arizona?  I used to teach in Arizona too.  I was a Title IX Remedial Reading Specialist Teacher in Kayenta, Arizona in 2002. It was my first teaching position.

          • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
            Kingston Apprentice
            Currently Being Moderated

            I taught at Cheyenne Traditional off of Frank Lloyd Wright and 100th in Scottsdale, AZ.

            Very traditional..........uniforms, snake line students going from one classroom to another and they actually advertised the school as "Teacher Centered."  Go figure.............

             

            Kingston

        • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
          Jeanne Rogers Apprentice
          Currently Being Moderated

          I suppose discipline could be a reason. I was able to curb any issues by telling students we can go back to sitting individually in rows. They didn't want that to happen, so there were very few serious discipline problems.  I've heard custodial staff express how much more time it takes them to clean a classroom if 'stuff' is spread out all over.  That's a consideration for the principal of the school. In most cases, I really believe it is the way it has been done. It worked. Why change? I agree with you that the environment needs to be more student centered. The 21st century skills demand the ability of others to communicate and collaborate.  You can not do that if you are not allowed to talk.

    • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
      cmuller Novice
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      Hi Lynne,

       

      After reading the article "Blended and Flipped Learning" in Tech & Learning, I remembered when substituting, some schools had “learning commons” where students had space to work and create, on their own or in small groups, outside of the traditional classroom.  Others did not. Students seemed to enjoy the group work more when able to go outside and sit at the learning commons table.

      • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
        Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
        Currently Being Moderated

        Hi Christine,

        It makes sense that students would like group work especially outdoors.  I think students enjoy talking with each other while doing something.  We, as adults, like being social and keeping busy.  It's so odd that in education, the old norm was to ask students to sit quietly for hours and take notes.  Engagement is a key to learning!  We remember much more by actively doing something than passively listening.

         

        Thanks for sharing your thoughts regarding the article in Tech & Learning.

         

        Lynne

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    I recommend looking at the article, "Creating videos for flipped learning," in eSchool News, September 9, 2013, "to learn how to create education videos for students through vodcasting, a cheap and easy way to flip classes." 

     

    What do you think of using vodcasting for flipping your classroom?

     

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    SIngraffea Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Wanted to share this new opinion piece in the NY Times profiling the first completely flipped school in the US: Turning Education Upside Down.

  • Re: Are you "flipping" your classroom?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    What do you think of the videos featured in this article--"10 must-watch videos for flipped learning"--published by eClassroom News (October 24, 2013)? 


    According to the article, "Part of the fun of flipped learning is introducing brief questions on relevant curriculum topics that students can discuss or use to create projects during class. For instance, based on historical definitions, should Pluto be a planet? If some products in the U.S. are identified through numbers, could replication of those numbers be made illegal? In other words, could a number itself be illegal?

    It’s these types of short videos, based in research and made for education, that can be a solid foundation for inquiry-based learning. They also can provide real-world examples of what’s being taught in schools."

     

    Are these videos worth your time?
    What valuable insights about flipped learning did you gain from watching these short videos?