7 Replies Latest reply: Dec 14, 2012 11:23 AM by Sam Morris RSS

Should we think like a teen to teach a teen?

Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
Currently Being Moderated

I read a research study from Common Sense Media that "provides a snapshot of how U.S. teens experience the role of social media in their social and emotional lives."

 

Using survey data from a nationally representative, probability-based sample of 13- to 17-year-olds, they addressed these questions:

  • How often are teens texting and using Facebook and Twitter?
  • What are teenagers’ favorite ways to communicate with their friends and family?
  • How do teens think these new communications tools are affecting their friendships and family relations, if at all?
  • How does social networking make most teens feel about themselves and their relationships with their peers? Does it make them feel more connected or more isolated? Better about themselves, or more depressed and lonely?
  • How do the heaviest social media users compare to other teens in terms of their social and emotional well-being?

 

Check out Social Media, Social Life: How Teens View Their Digital Lives.  I really liked the Teen Social Media Infographic.

 

How much do educators need to know about teens to teach them?

 

Do you think the best way to educate teens is through the use of digital technology?

 

Lynne

  • Re: Should we think like a teen to teach a teen?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Have you considered the idea that social media actually improves education? 

     

    Digital Learning Environments hosted by Tech & Learning posted an article claiming that indeed social media does improve education.  The article references a "paper written by Darrell M. West, the Vice President and Director of Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, How Blogs, Social Media, and Video Games Improve Education, (that) looks at the effect of collaboration on education when students can use tools such as wikis, blogs, social media, and video games."

     

    The article ends by stating, “Digital tools represent new ways for participation, engagement, and collaboration to take place. Through digital communications, students, teachers, parents, and administrators can share insights and reactions and develop a better understanding of instructional activities.”

     

    What is your view of this idea?  Can you perceive of ways social media can make your classroom instruction better and improve student learning?

     

    Lynne

    • Re: Should we think like a teen to teach a teen?
      pmaia New User
      Currently Being Moderated

      I used an on-line grading system called engrade last year and I saw students checking their grades with their iphones and keeping track of their make-up work. I plan on using it again and hopefully can use more of the features effectively.

      • Re: Should we think like a teen to teach a teen?
        Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
        Currently Being Moderated

        Hi Patricia,

         

        I believe students should be responsible for asking about make-up work and completing the assignments.  I like your idea for students to access their grades and make-up work via a program on their iphones.  This is a great use of modern technology and teaches the students to manage their achievement.  Keep us posted on how well this method works for you this year and how you adopt more of the features of the program.

         

        Lynne

      • Re: Should we think like a teen to teach a teen?
        abeanland New User
        Currently Being Moderated

        Our district has gone to online grading program called edustar.  It has been a fabulous tool for parents and students to be aware of their assignments and grades.  The students can no longer go home and say they have no homework.  The grading program tells the truth and opens up a whole new line of communication between the school, the parents and student.

  • Re: Should we think like a teen to teach a teen?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Another article in support of using technology to teach teens appeared in Education Week online: "High School Students Want More Tech, Fewer Lectures."  The post clearly states that students prefer hands-on, interactive projects using various forms of technology over lectures and traditional teaching methods.  This is more support for the argument that to teach today's teens, we must think like teens.

     

    Do you think lectures and other traditional methods are indeed a thing of the past?

     

    Lynne

  • Re: Should we think like a teen to teach a teen?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    eLearning Industry (December 12, 2012) posted an infographic about The Modern Student Learning Life.

     

    "StudyBlue created the inside look at the habits of the modern student. The data of The Modern Student Life Infographic comes from a survey issued November 26-30 to the company's users attending high school and colleges across the USA."

    Some highlights that should be noticed are

    • 93% of students use study apps
    • 70% of students study solo during exams
    • 59% of students use a mobile phone to study
    • 42% of students have as favorite place to study their bedroom
    • 30% of students prefer to use Google Drive

     

    The infographic gives a good overview of how teens think and the impact of technology on their study habits.

     

    Is there anything in this infographic that you find surprising?

    How could you use the information in this infographic to increase student learning in your classroom?

    • Re: Should we think like a teen to teach a teen?
      Sam Morris New User
      Currently Being Moderated

      StudyBlue's article is interesting, pointing out the amount of time students use apps and more.  It would be interesting to know the percentage of time they spend actually studying or using a study app versus amount of time spent texting, tweeting, checking Facebook, e-mail etc.

       

      I especially liked their online flashcard.  What a cool way to study using your smart phone.

       

      On your question, Do you think the best way to educate teens is through the use of digital technology? Without a doubt the answer is yes.  The school districts offering students their own Macbook, Ipad or other digital device are moving in the right direction.

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