5 Replies Latest reply: Nov 29, 2012 8:24 PM by cmuller RSS

What will learning look like in 2020?

Jane Brown Master
Currently Being Moderated

Video 1: Martin Van Der Werf describes the collapse of higher education, starting in 2009 with Khan Academy and in 2011 with Udacity.

Video 2: Bill Sam describes his predictions for what learning will look like in the 2020.

 

Believe it or not! At the very least, you will want to view these videos at Epic 2020

 

What do you think?

Will only the very wealthy attend university? Will student loans ceased to exist? Will Google take the lead in online education? How will Apple and Amazon participate? What do you think about their predictions? What do you think learning will look like in 2020? 

  • Re: What will learning look like in 2020?
    Tammy Dewan Novice
    Currently Being Moderated

    I have noticed a big increase in online learning and virtual schools.  Being a military wife, I see quite a bit of kids being taught online.  My husband and I talked about once he retires to go on a yearlong road trip around the US with our youngest 2 kids who will be 13 and 10 and put them into a virtual school for that year.  One of my friends is from France (not a military family) and put her daughter in a virtual French school where her daughter does school work for about 4 hours a day vs. the 7 hours a day attending traditional school.  Now, I just learned the family is moving to a remote village in China (where her father is from) for a couple of years so their daughter can learn Chinese.  I think exposing children to living overseas while keeping their own culture is getting easier. 


    So, I predict that there will be more virtual learning opportunities available for all age groups of students.  Arizona Virtual Academy is a great example of a successful online school that is free because it is publically funded.  It has about 4,000 students enrolled and is one of the fastest growing schools in AZ

  • Re: What will learning look like in 2020?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Amy Gordon wrote that eSchool News recently reported on "Six technologies that soon could be in your classrooms." This fourth annual Horizon Report names mobile devices to gaming environments as some of the future technologies for classrooms. 

     

    What technologies do you see in classrooms in the coming years?

    • Re: What will learning look like in 2020?
      Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
      Currently Being Moderated

      Marc Johnson responded to Amy's post with the following comments:

       

      Great read, Amy! Always interesting to me that the Horizon Reports' "far horizon" is four to five years. I know the reason for this is that predicting anything in technology beyond five years takes you into the realm of psychic predictions, but it still doesn't seem like five years should be labeled as "far"... but I digress...

       

      My prediction for a technology that will start to permeate classrooms in the next five years is voice (natural language) recognition. Imagine the interactive white board now understanding and reacting to a student or teachers voice request for action or information in addition to taps and written input. I see so many possibilities for it that could transform teaching and learning. Sure, lots of hurdles to get over, but I think we are well on the way to seeing voice recognition become ubiquitous. One more step toward true artificial intelligence??

       

      Marc

  • Re: What will learning look like in 2020?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    The November/December 2012 edition of eSchool News features an article--Wireless Experts: Time to Move Beyond the Device.  The author Meris Stansbury says that schools should focus more on policy, infrastructure, and content.

     

    A quote from the article states--"By 2016, 85 percent of all broadband service will be mobile instead of fixed. Last year, there were more smart phones in use (472 million) than PCs (353 million)."

     

    “According to Wireless Intelligence, mobile subscriptions are set to surpass the world population

    in 2014,” said Peggy Johnson, executive vice president of global market development for Qualcomm,“ and with increased anytime, anywhere access, mobile is empowering new types of learning, teaching, and assessment.”


    What do you think of these eye-opening facts as presented in this article?

     

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