19 Replies Latest reply: May 17, 2012 2:47 PM by Lynne Hoffman RSS

How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?

wizzlewolf New User
Currently Being Moderated

I would like to know how other art educators utilize technology in their classrooms. Also, how have you used Thinkfinity resources to bolster your teaching skills and enhance student engagement?

  • How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
    annefry New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I use Adobe Photo Shop and microsoft publisher to help students design their projects.

    I also have put most if not all of my presentations on powerpoint

    I use scanned images all of the time and I have made a few movies with windows movie maker.

     

    A couple of years ago I got my masters in classroom technology and added that endorsement to my license

    • Re: How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
      dtoyo New User
      Currently Being Moderated

      I teach advertising design at the university level. Of couse, Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign are part of the technology I use and teach with (it's a part of their curriculum).

       

      But for me, technology is simply a tool. The computer is a tool. It does not replace the function of ideation.

       

      Many students use said programs without first developing a plan of attack. A strategy. An idea.

       

      I teach primarily advertising design. And when I hand out an assignment, I have each student do research.

       

      Here's where the technology of the Web comes into play. They can use their computers to find Wiki facts. Google this or that. Look to Flikr for photo inspiration. Whatever information they can gather about the project.

       

      Then I have them write a thesis. Or in advertising terms, a "brief." It outlines what "product, catagory, etc" they have chosen. I also teach marketing, so each student is required to form a strategy that "attacks" a consumer strategy: a consumer insight. They include in their brief, facts and information to back their hypothesis.

      Target market and demographics. Current brand awareness as well as areas where the brand fails and how it can be improved upon. (I also grade their paper, including grammar and prose.)

       

      Once they have completed their brief, I use the old-fashioned "draw thumbnails". Use a pad of paper and draw as many ideas as one can. Start with the most basic or cliché. The purpose is to form a solid idea.

       

      Each "rough" as we call them (I am an advertising creative director and have been for 25 years) is critiqued before anything goes to the computer for final rendering.

       

      As part of my initial presentation, I may show examples of print ads, outdoor ads...the most clever I can find. Exampes of tasteful design as well. But nothing specifically related to their current project. All this is shown on a projector hooked to my computer. I also use powerpoint presentations.

       

      The worst thing to do is to have a student mimic work. Show award-winning work, but use them only as inspiration. Not as a template or a jumping off point. Inspire them with work (that I've gleaned from the Web, and my online subscriptions to Luzer's, One Show, and Communication Arts as well as things I find on You Tube or Vimeo).

      Students are given access to the same sites. But I can easily recognize plageurism. And any student simply copying an existing ad is told to go back to the drawing board.

       

      If students need help with Photoshop, Illustrator, or InDesign...yes, I do teach that. But only in ways that does not do the work for them. Helpful hints. At their level, they should have already completed courses in those areas.

       

      Techology is a tool. Not a crutch. Same for the computer itself. It's simply an art and design tool. It only facillitates their final "comp."

       

      The entire classroom participates in the review of their rough ideas. I of course will weed through their early thumbnails first.

       

      In their final critique, students also participate in the formal critique. Each student must present their work in front of the class, and I grade them on their presentation performance. They have to "sell" their project.

      There is a quick session of open debate. Does the ad or campaign work? (I provide the criteria). How can it be improved? And not simply on a design level, we discuss that, but on how well their idea/strategy/insight was fulfilled. Is the ad/design/campaign/TV spot/outdoor etc. impactful? Is it smart? Is it clever and simple? Can it attract a consumer, and motivate them? We are all consumers.

       

      The best work is when it goes beyond the cliche or expected. It breaks the rules. It might use the media in a different way than a traditional form. I leave that to the student.

       

      The question I ask each student is to think not simply horizontally, but think in a 360 degree space.

       

      I don't use pre-prepared lesson plans or slide-shows or powerpoint presentations. I create all my presentation pieces myself. I don't rely on material that may well be years old. Outdated. Since I work in "the business", I apply the similar work experiecs to the classroom. "Real life" situations that best suit a student for a professional career. Not a labratory setting whereby everyone works in a vacumm from days gone by.

       

      After each project, I give out a survey to the class. "What did they learn?" "What parrt of the process could have been better." etc.

      • Re: How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
        dtoyo New User
        Currently Being Moderated

        When I teach Photoshop, I give an assignment that isn't simply to cobble together diverse elements into one without a single idea. Or to create somekind of surreal art piece. If Photoshop is simply being used to create art, well fine. But for graphic design, give a student a purpose. Have them create an photo-realistic illustration for a product or something that isn't abstact. The eventual use of Photoshop in business is to render illustrations that serve a purpose for commerce. Otherwise, it's simply art for art sake. Yeah, okay, that's fine. But if you ask me, if you want to teach painting, paint the old fashioned way and take a brush to paper and canvas. If Photoshop is used to render something for fantasy, i.e. eventual gaming or illustrations for cinema, there's something that is "real" in a sense of using technology for an eventual career.

         

        In the area of technology and social media, I find it fine for students to post their work on FB so they can get peer feedback from their friends.

  • How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
    ziege3 New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I would like to know that as well.  Being new to Thinfinity, I need more anecdotal insight into how to use the site to its best purpose.  The guides are great but hearing from actual users is better.

  • How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
    wizzlewolf New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I don't want to bore anyone with all my "I do, I do, I dooooooooos". I am a techno fanatic in my class. I am currently in research mode. My county is interested in "INQUIRY BASED" teacher assessment. Therefore, one thing I did is create an inquiry research question: "How does technology affect student achievement in the art education classroom?"

     

    This is so interesting to me. We think technology is all that and a bag of chips. Is it? I want to collect date to prove that it does (or doesn't??) make a difference in regard to student achievement.

    So far this year, I have used teacher made videos, slide shows, taught kids how to use Photoshop as a learning tool; I have some classes creating digital portfolios, etc. Also, I have been asking students their opinions too. I created a survey form which I will pass out periodically. It is called POV. I want the student's point of view. How and what do they think about technology in the classroom?? I love seeing the responses. LOL

    That is enough for now.

    Hope you will all keep interacting and sending feedback. Thinkfinity is a good thing and has so much potential. LET'S USE IT!! :-)

    • How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
      ziege3 New User
      Currently Being Moderated

      Your technology skills in the clss room are eons beyond mine.  I have one computer which is the one I use for the book keeping of school and that is it.  I was told I would get some used ones from a lab that was being updated but that fell through.  So I am now going to look into getting some computers in another way.  I have only this year started to try to pull some technology into my classroom via an InFocua machine (which promptly broke on me!) and an old district lap top as well as a document projector.  In short, I am a novice at this technology thing and am looking for help getting it all going.  I teach with two other art teachers in my high school who are both ahead of me in this realm so I am also leaning on them for some help.  But, as I see it right now, the first thing I need to do is get some half decent computers into my room.  Then I will have to battle for the software, lol.  Jay

      • How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
        wizzlewolf New User
        Currently Being Moderated

        Jay,

        This is EXACTLY how I got technology stuff in my classroom. Back in the mid 90s when my school started bringing in technology, the art room was the last place they were going to put it. This didn't sit well with me, so I went to work. I wrote grants. Also, after about a year when other rooms were being upgraded, I stood at the door like a stubborn child. I ended up getting the "left overs". That was so great because it forced me to become even more computer literate because I had to take care of my student stations. I turned my art office into a mini computer lab with four computers. Most of my equipment is old by tech standards but I have kept all my stuff in good health.

        Now, I have proved my worth and get new technology when I ask for it. I just got an iPad for my room this year and I am waiting for a Smartboard to be delivered. All this takes time and energy. However, it is worth the trouble and it makes teaching much more fun and enjoyable.

        Sheree

        • How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
          ziege3 New User
          Currently Being Moderated

          It is comforting to know I am on the right track.  One of the other art teachers has about 10 computers that he does not use all of.  I am thinking I can talk him out of five.  They are old an lack the software needed in an art class but I will address that as I go forward.  If I can atleast get the kids a research station I will make a quantum leap on what I have now.  I am working on getting another InFocus so that I can start power points to help with a variety of instruction.

           

          So, in starts and fits I am hoping to get some technology into my classroom.

           

          Jay

           

          P.S.  Where are you?  I am in Dallas, TX  

          • How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
            wizzlewolf New User
            Currently Being Moderated

            Jay, I am an artist working Florida. Are you going to be using Pc or Mac? I teach at a special Ed school for EBD (emotional / behavior disorders) K-12. Keep in touch. I would love to hear more about your TECHNO quest!

            • How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
              ziege3 New User
              Currently Being Moderated

              I teach in a comprehensive high school in the inner city Dallas.  It is a really good school with good state ratings and a great faculty/student body.  I have been there 10 years and hope to stay until I retire or die, whichever comes first, lol.  I work with two other art teachers.  The three of us make up a good little visual arts department and we collaborate often.  One of my colleagues just got five new computers by going through some sort of training (not clear on what it was) but has had a long time getting the software....fianlly did.  I feel I need to get caught up with technology so I am looking at whatever source I can to get there.

  • Re: How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Have you seen the new, free online tool Draw Island for creating drawings and simple GIF animations.  It offers you a choice of four canvas sizes on which to draw.  There are two canvas sizes for creating simple GIF animations. To use Draw Island just head to the site and select a drawing tool. You can draw free hand (mouse) or select pre-defined shapes to use in your images. When you're done drawing, just click the save button to download your drawing or animation.

     

    I'm not an art teacher, but this looked like a cool tool for art students to integrate technology in their art curriculum studies.  I'd enjoy knowing what you art educators think about this tool and how students react if you use the tool with them.

     

    Lynne

  • Re: How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Art teachers, have you seen the Art Project powered by Google that features interior tours of seventeen world famous art museums?  You and your students can explore museums from around the world, discover and view hundreds of  artworks at incredible zoom levels, and even create and share your own collection of masterpieces.  It's astonishing how the world keeps evolving at our fingertips. 

     

    With the crisis in educational funding and the lack of money for many field trips, it's so great that technological advances bring the museums directly into our classrooms. 

     

    Lynne

  • Re: How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    I recently saw a still photography exhibit--OIL--by Canadian photographer Edward Burtynksy.  He depicted how oil is produced, distributed, and consumed..  He is known for large format photographs of how our individual choices inevitably affect our world. 

     

    It gave me an idea for an art project with students.  They could select a subject like oil and either paint or take photographs of the process from beginning to end.  As I mentioned briefly above, Burtynsky traced the story of oil  in pictures--preparing the land for pipelines, refining the oil, using  the oil to power cars and other machinery, building superhighways around  the world to accommodate the cars, experiencing oil disasters like the  one in the Gulf of Mexico last year, and destroying the earth with the  discarded oil by-products such as tires, airplane engines, and old  helicopter graveyards.  It was a thought-provoking exhibit.

     

    I am curious if any art teachers see how this might develop into a fascinating project for students of middle and high school age.

     

    Lynne

  • Re: How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
    wizzlewolf New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    It is Friday. There are only 12 school days left. I am FRIED crispy! LOL LOL However, I wanted to share one more project with you all. It is multi-media. I don't want to go into details because I am too tired. However, I can say besides drawing and writing, even the youngest kids learned the basics of Photoshop. Whoopee for that!!  I put up a video on my "The Art Kidz" YouTube channel. The video is about the Mayan Codex and how we made our own "CODEX". Enough said. Watch. We did good! :-)

     

     

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkKBhM1WOEE

     

    Enjoy!

    :-)

    Have a great weekend everybody. I will as long as you don't wake me up!!! LOL LOL

    Sheree

  • Re: How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
    kstuckenberg New User
    Currently Being Moderated

    I loved reading this discussion.  I am new to my grade level and to art.  I am more suited for science and left-brained curriculem, however, I am up for the challenge!!!  I want to engage the students in their art through the use of technology and other great eye catchers!!!

     

    Thanks for the start, I will check back-in when I have more to share.

  • Re: How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Have you seen the cool interactive site for young artists Fun Interactive Online Color Wheel?  Click on a color of the wheel and see how the machine mixes the color you have selected.  Have fun!

     

    Lynne

  • Re: How are you integrating technology into your art education curriculum?
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Be sure to have your students check out the Artist's Toolkit.

     

    This toolkit offers the six fundamentals of art, line, color, space, shape, balance, and rhythm. Watch an animated explanation of the fundamentals, find examples in works of art, and create your own work.  Put that knowledge to work by recognizing the concepts in works of art that are in museums, and finally, apply those concepts to your own creation.  Clicking on the Encyclopedia gives you even more examples.  This is a great site to use for all levels of students.

     

    Lynne

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