23 Replies Latest reply: Apr 5, 2012 2:27 PM by ysoudani RSS

Module 5 Discussion

stevenemerson New User
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There are plenty of problems with technology integration.  Anyone who has tried to set up an LCD projector in a classroom (even once) understands the limitless problems that can develop (the file I made at home is incompatible with this this version of PowerPoint, the settings are projecting the image upside down because my students thought it’d be funny to mess with me, the $10,000 bulb burned out and my department won’t buy another, is it CNTR+FN+F2…, or god-forbid I’m attempting to use a Mac/PC combo).  …And that’s just one type of technology.  As a whole, integrating technology in the classroom requires a society-wide change, including getting compatible computers at home as well as a school.  Then we have to figure out what we’re going to do with the “wireless phenomenon”.  Too many types of technology are all arising at the same time, which is making it difficult to mainstream anything across classrooms, let alone across school districts, states, or countries.  Once we get a grasp on it, though, technology is going to be a wonderful asset far beyond its current use.  Not only does it allow for the walls of the classroom to be opened or closed at will, it also allows for students of diverse needs to experience a differentiated instruction that meets their unique needs (as described in the reading this week).  Also, students with special needs can benefit from technologies that speak text aloud, magnify what they can see under a microscope, and allow the deaf to more easily engage in communication outside of the deaf community.

 

It’s too hard to generalize this and say that all countries are facing these same issues (although many that I stated above do seem as though they would appear outside the US as well).  I’m sure that everyone has their own issues in the classroom with technology integration, but it’s probably more specific to the culture and community of that area.  I would love, however, to go visit a classroom in Japan and see how they handle cell phones and wireless technology in school.

  • Re: Module 5 Discussion
    leetta89 New User
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                Every new school year, numerous educational technology tools are added to the lists that teachers must implement into their daily routines. This constant barrage of ‘new and improved’ makes for one the greatest barriers in using technology for education. Few teachers in the district are finding ways to incorporate these tools into the classroom, yet many other teachers have adopted a laissez faire attitude (Wheeler, Yeoman, Wheeler, 2009). This minimalist approach therefore restricts the implementation of technology to simple levels of application and awareness.

                Hall and Hord’s Concern-Based Educational Model (CBAM) helps to identify concerns relating to change in education (Schrum and Levin, 2009). This model enables teachers to identify a cycle of frustration that is often encountered. Since few teachers progress to upper stages where they can evaluate the use of technology, true collaboration is stifled. After further contemplation, support to this frustration is found in the idea that teachers should be comfortable in using technology if the tools are to be implemented into daily professional use (Schrum and Levin, 2009).  Many opportunities for this practice are lost in the stress of updating curriculum, attending numerous intervention meetings, or merely struggling with limited technology to support what is available.

                In the case of limited resources, other countries have developed initiatives of one computer to one child  (http://one.laptop.org). This is ironic, as many American teachers are struggling with the same issue. Great ideas are often abandoned simply for the lack of computers. Students cannot work productively on projects by sharing computers when using productivity software. Nor can a teacher keep every student constantly engaged when they are sharing iPads.  Because of limited resources, teachers often ask the question…is it really worth the time and effort? Why should so much effort be expended into learning technology and planning for the implementation of technology when there are not enough working computers? Yet again, the idea of using educational technology becomes stagnant when it is not supported at the basic level of providing the equipment.

                These frustrations point to the current problems hindering the implementation of technology into classrooms globally. The 2010 National Education Technology Plan states the goal,

     

    An essential component of the learning model is a comprehensive infrastructure for learning that provides every student, educator, and level of our education system with the resources they need when and where they are needed.

     

    With this goal in mind, it is up to teachers to ‘wait out the storm’ of tools heading their way.  To continue planning and preparing for lessons that use the technology so when the resources are available, we can move beyond simple awareness and begin true collaboration and innovation. 

     

    References:

     

    Schrum, L. M., & Levin, B. B. (2009). Leading 21st-Century Schools: Harnessing Technology for Engagement and Achievement. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

     

    Wheeler, S., Yeomans, P., & Wheeler, D. (2008). The good, the bad and the wiki: Evaluating student-generated content for collaborative learning. British Journal of Educational Technology. Vol 39 No 6. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing.

     

    U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology. (2010) Transforming American Education: Learning Powered by Technology. National Education Technology Plan 2010 - Executive Summary. Alexandria, VA: Education Publications Center.

    • Re: Module 5 Discussion
      amandac New User
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      LeEtta, I understand your point when you say that it is hard to implement technology usage in the classroom when there aren't enough pieces of working technology to go around.  I mentioned in my response to Steve that there may be an issue with budgets; so it's possible that your point is a two-fold barrier: not having the funds to provide the appropriate supply of tools.

       

      Even if the school can afford the ample amount of tools for every child in the school, it would be expensive to maintain and update.  I find that technology is always changing; what's innovative today is obsolete in two years.  If a school can afford something today, will their budget remain stable and ample to update to new tools? Can we be sure that we can constantly update our students with what's current, and implement the technology of today with tools of yesterday?

    • Re: Module 5 Discussion
      lonsdorf New User
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      LeEtta/Amanda,

                  One of the most frustrating things about technology for me as a “civilian” is how quickly technology moves forward; what was new and important one week is being replaced by the “next big thing” the following week. This is even more frustrating in the classroom setting where it is essential that you keep up.  We spend time and money on PD, we create lesson plans that revolve around specific technology, and use the public’s money to buy new tools.  The responsibility on us to make these tools consistently useful and lasting is huge. Yet, as we all noted, technology and the tools we use constantly evolve and change.  It is frustrating.

                  On a more lighthearted note, the entire time I was reading your posts/writing mine, I had this commercial playing on repeat in my head:

  • Re: Module 5 Discussion
    ysoudani New User
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    1. "Based on your academic and professional experience, what are some of the problems (and barriers) of educational technology?"

     

         It has become an ever-surprising battle as teaching practices metamorphosis into digital worlds of learning possibilities. It is beyond intimidating to the traditional teacher who has little no experience with technology, and it is more or less en exploration for the teachers coming into the school systems. Educational technology is asking today's educators to adjust their teaching methods and strategies in a way that engages learners, but one of the biggest issues is not only only, but how do incorporate it effectively!

     

         Schrum and Levin say that teachers respond best when you keep in mind two significant factors: that adult learning is improved when others demonstrate respect, trust, and concern for the learner; and that adults wish to be the originators of their own learning (selecting their own objectives, content, activites, and assessment) (106). I think it is easy to forget that we are responsible for making students responsible for their own learning and being creators rather than robots. We need the same power over ourselves to feel confident implementing a new resource in the classroom and within a school.


         This brings me to another barrier seen in my own internship experience and within some of the schools that I have had the pleasure of observing: community. Classroom community is a major pillar of a productive classroom, but community is just as important amongst teachers and staff. The text emphasizes the importance of changing the school culture from every aspect, such as implementing a technology coordinator that has experience (I would also prefer him or her having passion for technology) and a planning committees to bring together the teachers, administrators, parents and communities (108-111). So while a team effort is key, it is no mystery that some individuals are not taking up the idea very quickly or willingly. In his blog Richardson used the following quote: "Reforms are poorly implemented  where faculty and leaders lack the capacity to put them into action; districts and schools are often unable to develop and maintain comprehensive training opportunities at scale, and scarce professional development dollars are wasted where teachers turn over regularly"

    http://weblogged.com/2010/the-pd-problem.

     

         In terms of leadership, I think successful implementation will only be brought with passion and support. Unfortunately it is a chain of command that we follow. We need "leaders" to be supportive from the federal level well into the state level, providing each layer of the educational system, with the supportive and passionate environment that is necessary to help new changes become worth while. In this way the chain of command will become a stronger link to our students success in the digital classroom.

     


    • Re: Module 5 Discussion
      leetta89 New User
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      Indeed community is so important in developing and maintaining any type of reform within any industry. Although in the field of education, building a cohesive community is often difficult, even for the best administrators. When schools were small and every teacher in the school knew the students, building these communities were acheivable. Although in the past decades, as class sizes grew, the idea of community within the educational staff became a daunting task.  Now, micro-communities are built up and taken down with every school year and  every change of class by the teacher. This fact alone, makes it difficult to bring teachers together to form a single community with common goals; not necessary because we like to be our own bosses, but more out of the need to address the dynamic of the students in the classroom.  Now that technology has made the world smaller, we have a NEED to build these communities for our survival in a chaning global world.  Many administrators and teachers in schools have great ideas how to form these communities, yet to truly form a solid community that moves forward in an ever changing technological world, takes a majority of eager and willing proffessionals. That majority has not been acheived, just yet.

  • Re: Module 5 Discussion
    lonsdorf New User
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    Propmt 2: Article on video assessment of teachers

     

                This article is centered around the idea of using videos to evaluate teaching, and different organizations that are testing effectiveness/devices.  I had two immediate reactions: one, only teachers who are secure in their abilities and have a positive view of their teaching practices are going to volunteer for this; and two, is it not more effective to video the students during the lesson?

                Addressing the first reaction, I think my gut instinct was correct.  However, I also believe video assessment is something more and more schools will move to. This means that all teachers be being assessed by video.  It is true that schools now do one observation a year.  I know teachers who plan for months for this observation and go way over the top; this is not an accurate portrayal of their day-to-day teaching abilities.  I do not think this “showcase” will change with video observations, but, as it says in the article, I do think there are different benefits.  First, video assessment allows for more frequent observations, as administrators do not have to be present.  Second, it allows teachers to actually view themselves, what I think is THE key aspect and benefit of video assessment.  It is one thing to get a written evaluation back from an administrator; it is another entirely to be able to visually reflect on what you have done.

                The second reaction, viewing the reaction of students to a lesson, is not only the other key benefit of video assessment, but is also addressed in the article.  There are cameras now that offer an unmanned 360 degree view of the classroom during a lesson.  This enables a teacher to see the effect that their lesson is having on the students; whether they are engaged in the lesson, whether they seem to understand all of the lesson, etc..  Since the entire purpose of teaching is what effect it is having on the students, this type of evaluation can be invaluable.

                At Rutgers we have to video one lesson during our student teaching internship and show and get feed back from a professor and peers. I found this to be really beneficial. Based on my experience and what I read in the articles, I support video assessment and would be open to it in my classroom.

     

    http://www.eschoolnews.com/2012/03/01/video-becoming-a-key-tool-in-teacher-training-evaluation/

    • Re: Module 5 Discussion
      ysoudani New User
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      Kristen, I remember taking that class with you. Although it was a little nerve-wrecking to be evaluated by peers it was definitely beneficial. In light of your first reaction, which I myself had, I would think it best to have video assessments should be used as an evaluation that is to be thought of constructively. If school districts find this method more beneficial to their time constraints, it would inly help educators in the long run. This would help us know what our strengths are and where we need to improve in our teaching strategies and practices.

       

      I know teachers who prepare for weeks the lesson they will be observed doing, but I think the issue is surrounding the stigma of the practice. It is like for once, WE are the students and someone is lingering over our shoulder, so naturally we want to put our best foot forward. I think the mind set needs to be changed that evaluations are given to help improve the quality of education we providing.

       

      In response to your second reaction, I think students should not be fully aware they are being watched. When the principal or a supoerintendent is sitting in on the class, they are naturally uncomfortable or behave differently because it is a new pair of eyes they don't experience daily. I think video assessment will decrease this issue and make the evaluation more effective for the teacher. As long as the assessments are being looked upon as constructive pieces of evidence that can lead to a teacher and students success, why not?!

      • Re: Module 5 Discussion
        ckhurana Novice
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        Kristen, I absolutely agree with the benefits to the video assesment. Another major benefits from this kind of assesment could be that they are very objective. These videos will provide a single point of reference for all the people who are providing feedback to teachers.Secondly, I feel these evaluations would be more budget friendly. Once the camera is in place you can record as many times you want.

         

        But the issue I have with this kind of evaluation is if they are used for the intended purpose and not for teacher monitoring.

        • Re: Module 5 Discussion
          lonsdorf New User
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          I did not give much thought to the use of video cameras to be used in teacher monitoring, but now that you bring it up, I agree that it could be a major issue.  I am sure there are people who would totally abuse the use of the cameras.  Perhaps they can be devised so that the teacher needs to put in a password to activate them?  Or perhaps there can be a light that comes on (clearly) when it is recording?  I can not help but to think the idea of the camera monitoring me would always be in the back of my mind, which would affect my teaching.  In theory, no teacher should do anything in the classroom that they would not want to be seen by an administrator, but still, it does feel like an invasion of privacy. 

          • Re: Module 5 Discussion
            tsconover New User
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            Kristen/Cheshta,

            I also, had not considered monitoring teachers using video although I am not sure if it would be legal to record all of that without consent. I feel like one good thing about a video system in a classroom would be to desensitize the teacher and students to its presence. This way, all of the nervous lessons in the beginning of the year can give way to forgetting about the system and eventually lead to even camera-shy teachers appreciating their videos. Teachers could plan to tape a lesson that they think is going to go really well, or capture a science experiment for further analysis. Videos like these could also be used as part of a teacher's portfolio which, for now may be a binder with mostly papers and perhaps photos, but certainly will evovle into multimedia presentations.

            • Re: Module 5 Discussion
              stevenemerson New User
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              I had thought about video cameras in the classroom for security reasons, but until reading this discussion, I didn't even think about the feed being used for teacher assessment.  I agree with what a few of you said, that it would probably get abused somehow, or at the very least feel like you're being spied on.  I like the idea of video-taping your self teaching so that you can watch and learn from yourself.  Also, my last district allowed us to video-tape good lessons so that we could submit them to the school library for other teachers to watch and learn from.  No one likes administrator pop-in evaluations, but at least once they're there you know they're there; I think it would make me feel a little more self-conscious if I knew they could always just turn it on to see how I'm doing (and, hey, that may be a good thing too - to keep me on my toes, but I know I wouldn't like it).

  • Re: Module 5 Discussion
    amandac New User
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    Read Schrum and Levin’s Chapter 6 “Strategic Leadership” and note the focus of the chapter which looks at the challenges of using technology to support curriculum at all grade levels and within all content areas. The chapter specifically discusses the role of professional learning that our class will discuss further in Module 6. Richardson, has discussed professional learning as a challenge for technology implementation on his blog http://weblogged.com/2010/the-pd-problem. There are other challenges, problems and barriers that also exist with educational technology.

     

    1. "Based on your academic and professional experience, what are some of the problems (and barriers) of educational technology?"

    2. Do you believe that the problems and barriers that we face are unique to the United States or do you believe that these issues exist internationally?

    1. "B

                I feel that the biggest personal challenge in working with educational technology is personally being comfortable and confident in my abilities in using the tools before I can feel comfortable presenting it and teaching it to my class.  I understand that in order to bring myself to a higher comfort level, it will take initiative and dedication on my part (that was my motivation to take this class).  I am taking it upon myself to seek out opportunities to learn about the various topics and subjects that I personally feel weaker in.

    What I found interesting from Will Richardson’s web log entry is his discussion on how American teachers dedicate a majority of their time in the classroom compared to teachers in other countries, which are allotted more time outside of the classroom for professional development.  Where I would find it normal and expected to have to find the extra time to find learning and professional development opportunities outside of my work hours, Richardson’s discussion alludes to the idea that professional development is more integrated to the workday in locations outside of the United States.  I am not familiar with education in other countries, but if this difference of time dedicated to professional development is true, then I can definitely understand the sentiments of Richardson’s blog.

      He brings up issues from The Flat World and Education by Linda Darling-Hammond, and her stance on the need for educators to constantly share their experiences and up to date knowledge of issues in education today.  When the opportunity to share becomes few and far between, then there comes an inconsistent feed of material for teachers to implement in their own classrooms.  With the lack of new insight, teachers will be stuck in an education rut, bringing their students around and around with them.  I’m sure this issue is what drives other countries to provide more time for professional development for teachers, which is good to have a consistent, up to date education plan implemented in their schools.  However, I wonder how the teachers then balance their times in the classroom with time in professional development workshops. I always felt that going into education as a profession, there would be countless hours put into my work, that my job does not only occur with my presence inside the school; it’s practically a 24/7 job.  But is that only the expectation for teaching jobs here?  Are prospective teachers in other countries expecting more hours of personal development once they are placed in a school?

    • Re: Module 5 Discussion
      ckhurana Novice
      Currently Being Moderated

      Amanda,

       

      I am in agreement with the time and resources being biggest barrier in providing effective PD to teachers. However, they could be overcome by online PD. in order to provide good PD, a school could provide teachers with Online PD workshops or a community.Teachers can be provided with online sites to interact with fellow teachers. I think every school can have a social networking site for their teachers with a possibility to extend the connections beyond their own school(This can be done easily through a technology called sharepoint). these coonections can be developed over text/voice or through face time. This way Online PD will be useful to extend the reach beyond traditional PD. Also it would be useful in providing 'just in time' help for some of the things that Steve addressed in his post like" the file I made at home is incompatible with this this version of PowerPoint"

       

      Teachers can leverage on expertise available over online network which many a times is not available within a school.No travel required. Sustained and continued help can be provided especially when it is required the most.

       

      Great Post!!

      Cheshta

    • Re: Module 5 Discussion
      lonsdorf New User
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      Personally, I think another PD resources can be our peers.  In other words, when one teacher learns something new they share the information/skills/tools with the rest of the staff in their school.  While teachers tend to share tools and information between grades or departments, they seldom share with the whole staff. This can be through online resources, such as a webpage, even a simple email.  We are always asking our students to become experts and then jigsaw their knowledge, but we do not take our own advice.  If several people became experts on a new tool and then each shared their knowledge, it would not be too difficult to bring the tool to the whole.

    • Re: Module 5 Discussion
      tsconover New User
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      Amanda,

      My response is somewhat unrelated to technology but does involve it.  Most of my professional development opportunities come in the form of a lecture, which may or may not have a discussion component to it, and rarely much else.  Online PD and, as Kristen mentioned, sharing within a school, could make this better.  Teachers often use the idea that "you learn by doing" with students but then we go to workshops where we sit, listen, maybe take notes, hope there is a powerpoint and run out as fast as we can.  Professional development needs to be made more interactive and online tools would make this possible.  It is nearly impossible to have interaction when workshops often have an attendee-presenter ratio of 200-1.  Online tools would be great so that lectures could be re-viewed, discussions had among attendees and a discussion board of questions for the presenter that could be answered live and then after as well.  Professional development structured this way would make me feel like I had not wasted either my own or my school's time/money.

  • Re: Module 5 Discussion
    tsconover New User
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    Technology (video, online collaboration) is a valuable tool to assess teachers in the classroom.  As mentioned in the article, traditional evaluations of teachers rely on a supervisor sitting in the back of the room recording 1-2 observations per academic year.  While these in-person observations can still be valuable, they do not allow for a thorough analysis of a teacher’s overall performance. 

    A video system for recording observations can be used to take more frequent observations that a supervisor’s schedule would not permit.  This allows for teachers to be observed at various times of day, teaching a variety of subjects and types of lessons.  A video is also an objective recording.  While later opinions may vary on certain aspects of a lesson, the recording would allow the teacher and evaluator to review the scene again.  Video observations could also be used by the teacher for his/her personal lesson evaluation. 

    Classroom recordings could also be used to evaluate more than a teacher’s performance.  Evaluation of videos could point out flaws in classroom arrangement or troublesome student seating.  Many aspects of the classroom contribute to a student’s overall learning experience and video recordings could capture student reactions to lessons as well.  Online collaboration is also a useful tool in order to provide additional feedback on teacher performance.  Observations taken only by individuals who are familiar with the teacher, curriculum and school environment may miss small details that they take for granted. 

    Negative aspects of using video recordings of teachers involve the same issues brought up by in-person evaluations.  Observer effect (the impact of observing a process while it is occurring) is an obstacle to any known observation.  Taping while teaching can negatively impact the quality of a lesson by making the teacher nervous or uncomfortable.  However, I believe the negative feelings about being observed (especially recorded) can be alleviated by the consistent presence of a video recorder.  As teachers are able to view their own recordings, they may self-correct some of their behaviors before an evaluation points them out and become less camera-shy.

                I would not be averse to video tape evaluation.  While I definitely do not like to watch (or hear) myself recorded, I feel that it could be a valuable experience to be able to examine my teaching practice as others see it.  I would also like to share videos with other preschool teachers to gain insight, tips and tricks that are difficult to express through workshops and most forms of professional development

    • Re: Module 5 Discussion
      leetta89 New User
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      Tara,

       

      Video recording teachers for the purpose of evaluation would and will become a benefit for "all sides."  To put it short, it will keep everyone honest and evaluations will become meaningful.  In my past 8 years of teaching, I can honestly say that I have mastered the art of the yearly observation.  When my yearly observation comes about, I know exactly how to plan the lesson to meet the critieria of the observer. I honestly have to say, that my presentation of the lesson is always different when I am observered.  In other words, I don't feel that the observation truly reflects how my abilities to teach.  In addition, I am only being evaluated ONE time in a year.  How is one observation a true assessment of my ability to teach.  I would hope that using video would allow for more than one observation. In addition, it would help me to analyze student's behavior for the purpose of addressing thier needs more effectively.  The best thing about using video in a classrooom would be that I gives me another set of "eyes" to monitor students.  This will become more important as budget's get tighter and class sizes get larger. 

      • Re: Module 5 Discussion
        tsconover New User
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        LeEtta,

        I have done the same thing, put on quite the performance for an evaluation.  I'm sure I did a fine to good to great job on most other days so it isnt like that observation was something crazy, but no teacher can put that many hours of prep into a single lesson any other time.  And no matter how comfortable I am with my observer or how sure I am of the lesson material/success, the nerves get me every time and I forget something or stumble over a student question that any other day would not fluster me.

        I also support the use of video for the observing students.  Reviewing a recording could give insight into students who are distracted, exactly when some students grasped a concept, and over all attention span.  I have taken PD workshops about giving PD (meta-professional development?) and they mention that most adults lose focus after about 20 minutes, however a recording may reveal that a particular group of students needs a break after 10 minutes or another can go for 30 and become un-focused if interuppted before that.

  • Re: Module 5 Discussion
    amandac New User
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    Steve, I haven't even thought of your point as one of the big issues with technology integration; maybe I felt it was such a norm, it's to be expected. Of course we need to consider, "What happens when it doesn't work?" Then we're back to where we started before these pieces of technology came out. Also, because of all of the upgrades and new versions of this and that coming out, there seems to be an overload of what to choose from, and with so many choices, it can be hard for a whole school system to agree on using one kind of technology.  It's like me trying to figure out what I want for dinner while walking up and down a street packed with different food places: too many choices for someone indecisive.

     

    Also, I feel like there's the issue of budgets. New tools in technology are great; we go to conventions and see "the next big thing" presented to all the attendees, but budget is very important to consider (especially today).  Wouldn't it be difficult for schools to say that they want to drop money on pieces of technology when they had to lay off classroom teachers (who would be using the technology) and specialists (such as the media center teacher or librarian, who would most likely be taught about the technology first, as large pieces of equipment would be stored in the library for most classes to share).  There may be a slight upswing in the state of education budgets now compared to a couple of years ago, but is the improvement enough to invest in technology equipment?

  • Re: Module 5 Discussion
    leetta89 New User
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    Steve,

     

    How many times have I been in the same position...the battle of the Projector vs. teacher.  It's taken three years to finally iron out all the problems.  Now we have a new issues, internet security...it seems that our wireless network in the district has been compromised frequently. The tech. department has locked all of our computers so that we are no longer administrators of our own computers.  So, when it comes to opening up a new app, or video, or even some legitamate websites, we cant.  We have to put a "work order" in for the tech. department to grant permission for the needed site.  Being that our tech. department consists of three people to take care of all maintainence for student laptops (approx. 800) in the middle and highschool, teacher laptops, and building issues in 5 district buildings - work orders to grant permissions often become lost or outdated. I am hoping that with the newly approved budget, they get more people to help our tech. department!

    • Re: Module 5 Discussion
      stevenemerson New User
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      LeEtta,

       

      Abuse of technology is a huge issue, and it seems like any type of new technology can be abused.  The problem is that it only takes one person/event to mess it up for all of us - a student gets a hold of the teachers computer and accesses a prohibited site and broadcasts through the projector --> now teachers can't access needed internet sites, like youtube (a wonderful resource, yet very easily abused as well).  Another example is cell phones for students.  These are amazing handheld computers that students can use as calculators, take photos of lab activities, research for a history project, etc., but some students hide it under their desk and text --> now phones are not allowed in the school at all.  Hopefully as security gets better and society figures out how to manage this new technology-infrastructure, these problems will get ironed out.  In the meantime, it is pretty frustrating.

      • Re: Module 5 Discussion
        ysoudani New User
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        Honestly, after seeing that video in the beginning of the semester it eased my mind a little bit about cell phones. I think the fact that we don't allow them makes students more inclined to find ways around the system. Think about it, if it was no big deal to keep your cell phone on your desk, you would NEVER have to ask a student who's phone rang because it was concealed in some pocket or purse. Moreso if they were all required to keep them on their desk, a teacher would notice if they were not using it for the instruction. I am not saying jump on the cell phone usage in the classroom band wagon, but I see how science could really benefit from a high speed phone service network, as opposed to a visit to a computer lab. It is THAT much faster to get information and we are strict on how students can get there because they may be distracted. Students will find a way to distract themselves regardless of the era they grow up in, Make learning more accessible to them and we may be on to something

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