8 Replies Latest reply: May 24, 2012 11:58 AM by bkrhine RSS

21 March 2012 is World Poetry Day

Josie Whitehead New User
Currently Being Moderated

Do you have an ideas of how to make this day special? 

  • Re: 21 March 2012 is World Poetry Day
    snituama Novice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Indeed we do! EDSITEment put together this World Poetry list of resource for the last NCTE conference. Enjoy!

    Luca Signorelli. Portait of Dante

    Luca Signorelli. Portait of Dante (det.). Fresco. Cappella di San Brizio, Cathedral, Orvieto, 1500-1504

    World Poetry From EDSITEment (http://edsitement.neh.gov)

     

    World Poetry Feature http://edsitement.neh.gov/national-poetry-month-celebrating-world-poetry

    This feature, created for National Poetry Month 2010, details EDSITEment’s  offerings to students including lessons, selected web sites, and multimedia resources showing how poetry can serve to bridge the cultural divide within communities in America as well as worldwide.  

     

    Arabic Poetry: Guzzle a Ghazal! http: //edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/arabic-poetry-guzzle-ghazal

    In this lesson students learn about the ghazal, how it evolved, and why it has remained a popular form of Arabic poetry. They discover the form’s elements and structures and how its rhyming pattern compares to common forms of poetry in English.

    Indian Poetry: Lessons of the Indian Epics: The Ramayana http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/lessons-indian-epics-ramayana#sect-thelesson

    In this lesson, students read an abridged version of the Ramayana, and explore the ways in which the story elements, such as the Epic Hero Cycle, can be placed within the epic poetry tradition.

    Lessons of the Indian Epics: Following the Dharma http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/lessons-indian-epics-following-dharma

    This lesson plan is designed to allow students to explore Hindu culture by examining the characters of the Ramayana, and the choices they make.

    Lessons of the Indian Epics: The Ramayana: Showing your Dharma http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/lessons-indian-epics-ramayana-showing-your-dharma

    In this lesson students will expand their visual literacy skills while gaining insight on the characters and key events of the Ramayana.

     

    Japanese Poetry: Tanka? You're Welcome! http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/japanese-poetry-tanka-youre-welcome

    This unit on the Japanese tanka encourages students to explore the structure and content of the form and to arrive at a definition of the structure in English.

     

    Say Hi To Haliban Fun http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/say-hi-haibun-fun

    This cross-curricular lesson is designed to introduce students in language arts or social studies classes to elements of the Japanese writing style and the Japanese cultural concepts incorporated by the haibun.

     

    The World of Haiku http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/world-haiku

    In this lesson, students explore the traditions and conventions of haiku, comparing this classic form of Japanese poetry to a related genre of Japanese

     

    We also have a number of resource devoted to Dante:

    Literature & Language Arts

    Dartmouth Dante Project

    A searchable full-text database containing more than seventy commentaries on Dante's Divine Comedy - the Commedia.

    More »

    Art & Culture

    Digital Dante

    This resource, an EDSITEment-reviewed Blue Ribbon Site, contains texts and contexts for the Italian Renaissance writer Dante. This multimedia resource combines More »

    Lesson Plan / Literature & Language Arts

    The Autumn of the Middle Ages: Chaucer and Dante

    This page from EDSITEment features resources relating to medieval literature, and presents information about the works of Chaucer and Dante. More »

    Literature & Language Arts

    DanteWords

    A richly visual site providing compelling images, both new graphics and classic artwork, to supplement a classroom reading of Dante’s Divine Comedy. More »

     

    Lesson Plan / Literature & Language Arts

    A Storybook Romance: Dante's Paolo and Francesca

    This lesson from EDSITEment highlights one episode in the "Divine Comedy" to provide students with an introduction to Dante's great poem. More »

     

    Shelley

    Program Specialist, EDSITEment

     

  • Re: 21 March 2012 is World Poetry Day
    Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
    Currently Being Moderated

    Hi Josie,

     

    In addition to World Poetry Day, the U.S. celebrates April as National Poetry Month and National Humor Month.  To add to the resources Shelley provided for World Poetry Day, Thinkfinity offers some good ideas for teaching poetry and humor for K-12 students on its web page Humor and Poetry.  You may find some helpful resources there for your poetry celebration.

     

    Lynne

    • Re: 21 March 2012 is World Poetry Day
      Josie Whitehead New User
      Currently Being Moderated

      Hi Lynne - I'm actually a children's poet myself, as well as having been a teacher all my life.  I was just going to suggest that if any of the teachers didn't have any ideas for this day, or for National Poetry Month, they might like to see the website which I've made which contains hundreds of my poems.  You can never be sure you are going to retire as a teacher, especially if you meet local children.  I volunteered to go into my local primary school once a week, as many retired people do (and I always loved being in a classroom so felt at home). There I met a class of children who told me they loved poems written with rhyme, rhythm and stories, and I said that this was exactly what I loved when I was a child.  No "free verse" poetry for my generation.  Oh no no no - although I have written a few.  So I took them one poem a week into their classroom and was amazed how they loved them - really amazed for I thought they were old-fashioned.  Now they go out to classrooms all over the world, and so do I, via Skype.  I'd love it if some of you teachers were to do some lesson plans for Thinkfinity using some of my poems - but being a teacher, I should be able to do this myself.  I'm going to see your good ideas for teaching poetry and humor for K-qw students Lynne.  I hope you told them to learn a little about "metre" because without a bit of rhythm, poems can be like music without rhythm, ha ha.  Oh, I know I won't be popular for saying this.

      • Re: 21 March 2012 is World Poetry Day
        Josie Whitehead New User
        Currently Being Moderated

        Oh, to get to the poetry website, just Google JOSIE'S POEMS.  You ought to try writing some poems yourselves, teachers, but be warned.  They are addictive, rather like word puzzles.

      • Re: 21 March 2012 is World Poetry Day
        Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
        Currently Being Moderated

        Hi Josie,

         

        I think it's great that you are sharing your poems with students in classrooms and via Skype.  The lessons that appear in Thinkfinity are provided by content partners so I don't write any of the lessons.  However, you certainly could incorporate some of your poems into lessons that you teach using Thinkfinity poetry resources. 

         

        I agree with you that good poems have rhyme, rhythm, and meter which gives them a musical quality.  For that reason, I've always enjoyed Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Shakepeare's plays.  My choices reflect my career as an English teacher. 

         

        However, many good poems are written in free verse (although not my favorite style).  To quote Samuel Taylor Coleridge:  “I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry; that is, prose = words in their best order; — poetry = the best words in the best order.”  He said nothing about rhyme, rhythm, or meter.  Interesting!!!

         

        Thanks for sharing your insights regarding poetry.  Good luck in continuing your poetry writing.

         

        Lynne

         


        • Re: 21 March 2012 is World Poetry Day
          Josie Whitehead New User
          Currently Being Moderated

          Hi Lynne - Thank you so much for your kind remarks. I don't teach any more Lynne.  I am 70 years of age and have done my bit, ha ha.  I just provide a very useful resource for teachers of English and their children the world over now and I'm glad, at my age, to be able to leave something of myself to the world of education, and to children in particular that both delights them and that will help them with literacy and performance poetry.  I hope they didn't mind that I mention the website on here, but I know that many teachers would probably love to use the poems I've written in their classes - - - well, they already do.  They go into thousands of classrooms.  The problem is that once you've been a teacher, it is hard to say goodbye to the world of education. Best wishes and thanks again.  Josie

          • Re: 21 March 2012 is World Poetry Day
            Lynne Hoffman Apprentice
            Currently Being Moderated

            Hi Josie,

             

            From looking at your website--Josie's Poems, you definitely have written poems to delight the imagination of children.  I think you are correct--once a teacher, always a teacher.  I agree that it's really not possible to say goodbye to the world of education.  I view myself as a lifelong learner which keeps my mind challenged.  I taught English and technology for 35 years, and now I'm enjoying a second career as a technology consultant.

             

            It's fine for you to mention your website in your post because this Community networks educators globally.  Sharing ideas is one of the main purposes of this site.  We appreciate your input and expertise.

             

            Lynne Hoffman

            Verizon Thinkfinity Community Host

      • Re: 21 March 2012 is World Poetry Day
        bkrhine New User
        Currently Being Moderated

        Congratulations!  I love what you did (writing poetry and sharing poetry with your class).  My grandmother was a poet, and her poetry was published in a book when she passed away.  I've always loved to read poems (not free verse) and it's really fun, now, to share them with students who are trying to decipher abstract/figurative language.  I'm a speech-pathologist at the secondary level.

        Sounds like you're retired?

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...