6 Replies Latest reply: Mar 1, 2012 12:43 PM by epmiller7 RSS

Marzano's Nonlinguistic Representations

epmiller7 New User
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Hello!

I was wondering if any of you have used nonlinguistic representations (as explained by Marzano) in your classrooms? How have you used it? Do you have any websites or online articles that you would recommend?

 

Thanks so much,

Emily

  • Re: Marzano's Nonlinguistic Representations
    mso Novice
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    Hi Emily,

    A simple article/explanation of nonlinguistic representations appears in "Learning Focused" website - article by Bill Blynt. I found it informative and to the point. These strategies are especially effective for English Language Learners.

    Here is the link...

    http://www.learningfocused.com/index.php/resources/newsletter/what-are-nonlinguistic-representations

     

    Mso (marie)

    • Re: Marzano's Nonlinguistic Representations
      epmiller7 New User
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      Marie,

      Thanks! I like the examples in the article. I am studying this strategy for a class in my masters program, and I'm looking for any and all information I can find on it. I've used different nonlinguistic activities with my students, and they've always liked them, so I thought I would research into it further.

       

      Emily

  • Re: Marzano's Nonlinguistic Representations
    epmiller7 New User
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    Hello again!

    I'm really interested if anyone has used this strategy in their classroom. What activities have you done? Did it help students' understanding? What do you like about this strategy? What don't you like about this strategy?

     

    I appreciate any and all comments!

    Thanks!

    • Re: Marzano's Nonlinguistic Representations
      nkolodziej New User
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      Hi Emily,

       

      I agree with Marie that the use of nonlinguistic representations can be particularly useful for ELLs, but this strategy is effective for students of all ages and backgrounds. I have taught at multiple grade levels (early elementary, middle school, and college level) and have used nonlinguistic representations with students at each of these levels.

       

      When I taught first grade, the use of nonlinguistic representations provided an avenue for my novice writers to express themselves (drawing pictures, creating model using math manipulatives, etc.) in ways that they could not yet do through writing. This brings to mind some of ReadWriteThink’s student interactives such as the Comic Creator and the CD/DVD Creator (see http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/ to view all RWT interactives).

       

      At the middle level, one of my students’ favorite activities was to participate in creative drama. They acted out vocabulary words, created skits to demonstrate inferencing skills, and even constructed “outlines” using real objects. You can view a lesson plan I created, “Developing Story Structure with Paper Bag Skits” that was based on my use of skits with middle level students on ReadWriteThink (http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/developing-story-structure-with-1024.html). At the university level, my students continue to learn and express themselves using nonlinguistic representations. We use hands-on learning activities, engage in cooperative learning activities (think-pair-share is nearly a daily occurrence), etc.

       

      Here is a reference to a helpful article by Marzano about this strategy:

      Marzano, R. J. (2010). Representing knowledge linguistically. Educational Leadership, 67 (8), 84-86.

       

      Nancy

  • Re: Marzano's Nonlinguistic Representations
    Jim Bellanca New User
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    I am somewhat amazed that this question is being asked, especially by a Master's candidate. Where was the undergrad work? (obviously not in Nancy's class!)  If that school lacked a requirement that pre-teachers know how to use nlrs before they entered a classroom, money back is due.   Thirty years ago my colleagues and I learned to use  graphic organizers and other representations that were .being introduced into classrooms. As Nancy notes, they work with all students, even the most hard to reach kids...if the nlrs are well presented by the teacher. Marzano's research has been around for several decades showing not only the motivational grab of representations (like #1),but also their adaptability in technology (Classtools, Readwritethink, etc.) (like #2), their impact on achievement (big like #3) and now their development of 21st Century Skills (super big like #4). Short side: undergraduate teacher programs that don't prepare students with the basics of good teaching including nlr's) (dislike #1) and the propensity of school districts that put greater emphasis on basic test scores over all the other benefits of nlrs and other well researched strategies. When combined with the other research of best practices on the Marzano Research Lab site, nlr's are even more effective. A close look at analytic nlr's will also show the benefits of using nlrs to develop lessons and projects for the CCSS. In short, the skinny on nlrs power in the classroom is well established and belongs in every undergrad teacher prep program. .

    Jim

    • Re: Marzano's Nonlinguistic Representations
      epmiller7 New User
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      Actually, Jim, I asked the question because of the directions of our assignment. I'm enrolled in a technology class and we are doing a collaborative project focused on Marzano's strategies. The focus is not the strategies themselves, but the tools we can use online to research, collaborate, and become immersed in the online community of educators. We were given the assignment to start a discussion on a social network about our designated strategy.

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