Celebrate El Día de Los Niños/El Día de Los Libros (Children's Day/Book Day)!April 30 is El Día de Los Niños/El Día de Los Libros (Children’s Day/Book Day). Developed under the leadership of author Pat Mora, this celebration focuses on providing children with books in many languages and making reading an integral part of their lives.

 

El Día de Los Niños/El Día de Los Libros is supported by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association (ALA), and REFORMA, an ALA affiliate that provides library and information services to Latinos and the Spanish-speaking community.

 

This week on ReadWriteThink, you can find activities for El Día de Los Niños/El Día de Los Libros as well as other lesson plans and resources for timely classroom activities. Have a great week!

 

New Resources

 

From the Calendar 

 

Connecting with Other Teachers

 

If you have feedback or questions about ReadWriteThink, all you have to do is contact us. Have a great week!

 

—Traci Gardner

First grade reading - small group breakoutApril is both National Poetry Month and National Humor Month. Celebrate by having students  write funny poems and perform them for their classmates. Try using interactive poetry tools, or challenge your students to create a video about their written work to share with others. For more ideas, check out how others bring humor and giggles into their classrooms on the Thinkfinity Community.

 

This week on ReadWriteThink, you can find more resources for timely classroom activities. Have a great week!

 

New Resources

 

From the Calendar 

  • April 18: Paul Revere began his famous midnight ride in 1775.Through the study of Paul Revere, students learn about primary source documents while researching their family histories, with which they create and compare their family trees.(For grades 4–8)
  • April 20: Celebrate author Mary Hoffman's birthday. Students write original picture books based on their own aspirations and dreams and share with the class or with younger students. (For grades 1–9)
  • April 21: Barbara Park, author of the Junie B. Jones series, was born. Students write their own “Junie B.” stories, based on the Junie B. Jones series, after brainstorming issues they’ve experienced during the school year. (For grades 1–6)

  • April 22: Celebrate Earth Day! Students research famous environmentalists and write letters to them asking for their opinions on current issues and turn their letters into a poem. (For grades 3–12)

  • April 23: William Shakespeare was born in 1564. Based on grade level, students learn about rhyming structure, experiment with the Shakespearean Insult Kit, or study scenes from Othello and watch an adaptation of that scene from the movie O.(For grades 1–12)

  • Look ahead to next week for literacy activities on the Library of Congress, the bombing of Guernica, and the birthdays of Coretta Scott King, August Wilson, Lois Duncan, and Yusef Komunyakaa.

 

Connecting with Other Teachers

 

If you have feedback or questions about ReadWriteThink, all you have to do is contact us. Have a great week!

 

—Traci Gardner


[Photo: First grade reading - small group breakout by woodleywonderworks, on Flickr]

snituama

Pass It On! Family Stories

Posted by snituama Apr 15, 2011

The American Library Association is sponsoring a Pass It On: Preservation Week April 24–30, 2011 highlighting what we can do, individually and together, to preserve our personal and shared collections. 

 

One way to work on this in our schools is by having students collect and preserve personal, family or community heritage.  See two EDSITEment lessons where students explore how stories that comprise our personal and family history are developed and instructs students in how to gather such information.

What is History? Timelines and Oral Histories 

In this lesson, our youngest students (K- 2nd grade) will gain a frame of reference for understanding history and for recognizing that the past is different depending on who is remembering and retelling it. They will construct a timeline based on events from their own lives and family histories. This will give them a visual representation of the continuity of time. They will also be able to see that their own personal past is different in scope from their family's past, or their country's past.

Versions of History Chart   

provides a worksheet for students to record their interviews

Listening to History

Family stories help teach us who we are, connecting us to a heritage handed down across generations. But when we listen closely, family stories can also be a resource for historical research. They can take us back through memory to the scene of pivotal events or give us a feel for the impact of broad social change, providing a uniquely personal insight into our nation's past.

 

This lesson which can be adapted for different grades helps students tap this resource by conducting oral history interviews with family members. Through a series of classroom activities, the lesson introduces students to the riches historians can discover in firsthand recollections; helps them choose a topic and prepare for a productive family interview; provides tips for conducting and recording the interview; and offers suggestions for sharing their family stories in a historical narrative or report.

 

Shelley,

EDSITEment

NASA GOES-12 Full Disk view March 30, 2010It’s nearly Earth Day! Energize students about preserving the environment with eco-friendly classroom lessons and interactive games from Thinkfinity.org.

 

This week on ReadWriteThink, you can find more resources for Earth Day and other  poetry activities, lesson plans, and calendar resources to support you. Have a great week!

 

New Resources

 

From the Calendar 

 

Connecting with Other Teachers

 

If you have feedback or questions about ReadWriteThink, all you have to do is contact us.

 

—Traci Gardner


[Photo: NASA GOES-12 Full Disk view March 30, 2010 by NASA Goddard Photo and Video, on Flickr]

tengrrl

Celebrating Poetry

Posted by tengrrl Apr 3, 2011

French Lilac DetailThe first days of April always make me think of the Prologue to Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, of T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, and of Whitman’s “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d.”

 

So many April poems, it’s little wonder that April is National Poetry Month. This week, ReadWriteThink has poetry activities, lesson plans, and calendar resources to support you. Have a great week!

 

New Resources

From the Calendar 

 

Connecting with Other Teachers

 

 

If you have feedback or questions about ReadWriteThink, all you have to do is contact us. Have a great week!

 

—Traci Gardner 

 


[Photo:French Lilac Detail by farlane, on Flickr]

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